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hypothyroidism checklist

Hypothyroidism: What Is It and Do You Have a Problem? Use This Hypothyroidism Checklist

In America, it is estimated that around 20 million people have some type of thyroid disorder.

Recently, you may have had weird symptoms that showed up with no obvious cause.

Are you wondering why you can’t lose any weight? Or wondering why you’re always tired? You may have hypothyroidism.

We have provided a hypothyroidism checklist to help you find out.

What is Hypothyroidism?

Hypothyroidism is a disorder of your thyroid, which is the gland in your neck that produces essential hormones. Hypothyroidism is where your thyroid isn’t active enough, whereas hyperthyroidism is where it acts up too much.

When you have hypothyroidism, however, that means that you aren’t getting enough of the hormones you need to function normally.

You may not notice the symptoms at first, but if the condition is left untreated, you could experience more serious symptoms.

There are different tests to see if you have hypothyroidism, and the condition is normally treatable.

Common Causes

Hypothyroidism can affect many people. However, there are different reasons why some people may experience it and some may not.

Family History

If your family has had a history of a thyroid disorder, then you may have a higher chance of getting it as well.

While this is true, genetics is not the only thing that determines if you will get hypothyroidism or not. While it is not the only determining factor, there is a history of genetics directly linked to the disorder.

This is why it’s important to you know your family medical history.

Autoimmune Disease

One of the most common causes of hypothyroidism is an autoimmune disorder. These happen when your immune system starts making antibodies that attack your own body rather than germs.

Sometimes it can even start attacking your thyroid. Researchers aren’t exactly sure why this is happening, but it could be linked to your genes or environmental triggers.

Medications

Some of the side effects of medications can even contribute to developing hypothyroidism.

Lithium, a medication used to treat psychiatric disorders, could be linked to this disorder.

If you are taking any kind of medication, you should ask your doctor if it has any effect on your thyroid gland.

Pregnancy

Pregnancy could even be a cause for hypothyroidism. Having hypothyroidism and not realizing it can also lead to future miscarriages and problems with delivery.

Having this disorder without treating it could also affect the developing child.

Iodine Deficiency

We don’t have this problem as much in the United States, but not getting enough iodine could also cause the disorder.

In the U.S., iodine has been added to table salt which has pretty much gotten rid of the problem here. However, around the world, it is more common.

Common Symptoms

Everyone might experience different symptoms when they have hypothyroidism. However, here is a good hypothyroidism checklist to start.

Hair Loss/Skin Issues

This is one of the visible changes you may start to notice if you have an issue with your thyroid.

Your hair may start falling out and feeling thinner in some spots. It may not even be just the hair on your head; you could even start losing some hair in your eyebrows, arms, or legs.

Your skin may start to become more dry and scratchy or more oily, which can produce more acne. Skin problems are one of the most common problems.

Change in Weight

Everyone’s weight changes, but if you notice a dramatic change, hypothyroidism could be the cause.

Hypothyroidism affects rapid weight gain without any other good cause. If you have lost a lot of weight, you may have hyperthyroidism.

Menstrual Problems

If you are a woman who thinks they have a thyroid problem, you may start to notice changes in your period cycle.

Hypothyroidism could make you have more blood flow in your cycle and also make it longer. This doesn’t happen to every woman, but if you notice it along with other symptoms, you should take note of it.

Mental Illness

Having mood changes with no explanation is also a common symptom.

If you notice feelings of anxiety or depression that seemingly come out of nowhere, this may be thyroid-related.

This disorder causes the serotonin levels in your brain to start to lower which can increase the chance of depression.

Anxiety can also happen when your body is working overtime, and you feel restless and don’t have much energy. Hypothyroidism can also actually start to slow down the synapses in your brain, which can cause you to feel slow and foggy.

Sleep Problems

You may also have problems with sleeping. Most people with hypothyroidism normally feel tired and sluggish, even after getting a good night’s rest.

They may also have trouble falling asleep and staying asleep, which may contribute to their tiredness.

When people have a lot going on, they may feel tired all of the time anyway. However, if you experience this along with some of these other symptoms, you may want to visit your doctor.

Abnormal Blood Pressure

The hormone that the thyroid produces is in charge of how fast or slow the heart beats.

But when your thyroid isn’t working enough, your heart rate may be lower than normal, which can affect your other organs and your day-to-day function.

Changing Temperature

If you are always feeling cold, this may be a sign that you are having problems with hypothyroidism.

Because you have a lower circulation of blood in your body, you can feel extremely cold even when it’s hot outside or no one else feels cold.

Use This Hypothyroidism Checklist and Get Tested

This is a good hypothyroidism checklist to see if you may have an issue with your thyroid. However, you should still get tested to see if you actually have the disorder.

You can schedule an appointment with us today to see if you actually have hypothyroidism.

how to test for gluten intolerance

9 Telltale Signs You Have A Gluten Intolerance

3.1 million Americans are currently following a gluten-free diet. But many people may be gluten intolerant and not even realize it. If you’ve been wondering if gluten has a negative impact on your body, this article is for you.

Read on to learn how to test for gluten intolerance, and the top signs you may need to cut gluten from your life. 

Ready? Let’s get started.

What is Gluten?

Gluten is a protein that’s found in barley, rye, and wheat. For people who have problems processing gluten, this protein triggers an immune response, and their body attacks their small intestine.

These constant attacks cause damage to the small intestine. This is a problem because it’s the small intestine’s job to help your body absorb nutrients. For people with Celiac disease, their bodies can’t process food when they eat gluten.

Approximately 1% of the worldwide population has Celiac Disease, according to the Celiac Disease Foundation. And approximately 2.5 million Americans have Celiac Disease but are unaware. 

If your body has problems with gluten, you may have symptoms right after you eat a meal that’s heavy in gluten. However, you may also not experience symptoms for weeks after that meal. That’s why it can be difficult to know if you’ve got Celiac Disease or gluten sensitivity.

Signs of Gluten Intolerance

If you’re constantly feeling unwell, there are many things it could be attributed to. But there are a few signs of gluten intolerance that you should know. Here are some of the telltale signs you could be sensitive to gluten:

1. Bloating

Bloating is one of the most common signs of gluten intolerance. It’s not normal to feel bloated every time you eat. The reason this happens is that gluten is causing inflammation in your digestive tract.

Gluten can even cause bloating for people who aren’t particularly sensitive to gluten. But if you have persistent bloating in your lower abdomen, it may be related to gluten intolerance. 

2. Diarrhea

This is another one of the most common symptoms of gluten intolerance. If you’re constantly suffering from loose and/or watery stools, it may be related to the gluten you’re eating.

If you cut out gluten and you’re no longer running to the bathroom, you may be sensitive or intolerant to gluten. 

3. Fatigue 

If you’re constantly exhausted no matter how much sleep you get, this is also a symptom of gluten intolerance. 

Since gluten can damage your small intestine, your body can end up deficient in important vitamins and minerals. These deficiencies can also lead to fatigue and exhaustion.

4. Constipation

While many people suffer from diarrhea with celiac, constipation is one of the less-known symptoms. 

Out bodies have tiny projections called villi in our small intestines. Gluten intolerance damages these villi, which are responsible for nutrient absorption. As your food travels through your digestive tract, your villi can’t absorb these nutrients, and will often take extra moisture from your stool. This leads to constipation. 

5. Dermatitis Herpetiformis

Dermatitis Herpetiformis is an itchy rash that typically occurs on your butt, knees, and elbows. It’s one of the telltale signs of celiac disease.

You may even notice this rash without any of the typical gastrointestinal symptoms that many people experience with gluten sensitivity. 

6. Canker Sores

Canker sores can be extremely painful and can make it difficult to eat, talk, and even swallow.  

These sores occur in the mouth and are common for people who have braces or are sensitive to Sodium Lauryl Sulfate which is found in toothpaste and shampoo. 

If you’re constantly suffering from canker sores and you’re using an SLS-free toothpaste, gluten may be the culprit. These are a sign of inflammation in your upper digestive tract. 

7. Migraines

There are many things that cause migraines, including chocolate, alcohol, cheese, menstruation, changes in the weather, and more. 

However, if you can’t pinpoint a common trigger for your migraines, they could be due to gluten sensitivity. People who are intolerant to gluten typically have more migraines than those who are not.

8. Endometriosis

Endometriosis leads to painful periods and can be debilitating for some women. One study found that 75% of women who had been diagnosed with endometriosis had a significant change in the wors of their symptoms after they went gluten-free for 12 months.

This is a massive statistic, so if you have endometriosis, a gluten-free diet could change your life.

9. Iron Deficiency

As mentioned people who are sensitive to gluten have problems absorbing nutrients. This can cause iron-deficiency anemia, which occurs when you have a lack of red blood cells in your body.

If you’re deficient in iron, you may notice dizziness, headaches, chest pain, weakness, and fatigue. If you’re eating iron-rich foods and/or taking vitamins but you’re still deficient in iron, the problem may be caused by the gluten you’re eating.

How to Test for Gluten Intolerance

If you were nodding along while reading the above signs and symptoms, you may be gluten intolerant. Before cutting out gluten, it’s a good idea to get tested so you can be sure that this is your problem. 

A simple lab test can tell you whether you’re gluten intolerant, or if you have another issue that’s impacting your health. While gluten may very well be the problem, it’s important to get tested before you cut it out of your diet. 

Gluten-free foods are not necessarily healthier than those with gluten and are often higher in sugars, fat, and sodium, and lower in nutrients. A simple blood test can tell you for sure if you have an issue with gluten. 

Wrapping up

If you’re gluten intolerant, you may have simply gotten used to always feeling sick, tired, and bloated.

You don’t need to live this way. A diagnosis can help you learn which foods to avoid, and help remove these signs and symptoms from your life. 

If you’re wondering how to test for gluten intolerance, we can help. Get in touch today to book an appointment and get the tests you need to regain your health.

 

 

4 Causes of Fatigue You Should Be Aware Of

Fatigue is defined as extreme tiredness, and it can be caused by any number of mental health or medical conditions. Some of the most common causes for fatigue are easily diagnosed through simple lab tests. If you are experiencing frequent fatigue, you should consider other symptoms to try to narrow down the cause.

Anemia

There are several different forms of anemia, but the most common is low iron levels in the blood. If you are anemic, you may also experience dizziness, weakness, and a pale complexion in addition to fatigue. This can be determined by a simple blood test. If confirmed, it can usually be treated with iron supplements.

Type 2 Diabetes

Having high blood sugar can often make you feel fatigued. Shakiness when you do not eat, feeling extremely tired just after eating, or sweet-smelling urine are some additional symptoms of type two diabetes. This can also be determined through a simple panel of blood tests that will determine your blood sugar levels at time of test and for the previous three months. If confirmed, you will need to see a doctor for treatment. Continue reading “4 Causes of Fatigue You Should Be Aware Of”

Everything You Need to Know About DNA Testing

You don’t have to look far to find someone who has undergone DNA testing, either for medical purposes or simply out of curiosity. But how exactly does DNA testing work, and when should you use it? Here’s everything you need to know.

What Is DNA?

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is genetic material that contains the coding that gives us all life. The building blocks of DNA are abbreviated by the letters A, T, C, and G. DNA is so complex that about 3 billion letter pairs combine to create the DNA code of every living being.

In humans, DNA letter pairs form into tightly coiled strands we call chromosomes. The arrangement of chromosomes and DNA sequences determine everything from your physical characteristics to your body functions.

Why Undergo a DNA Test?

There are many different reasons that you might submit to a DNA test:

  • Confirm or eliminate a relationship based on genetics
  • Learn more information about your family tree and ancestry
  • Identify your specific health risks, like breast cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and age-related macular degeneration

Continue reading “Everything You Need to Know About DNA Testing”

Pregnant? You Need These Basic Lab Tests

As soon as you become pregnant, your health becomes even more important than it was before. In order to help your baby grow and develop without any complications, it’s essential that you monitor your health.

You can expect many doctor’s visits, tests, and examinations as your doctors work to evaluate your wellness and identify any potential complications. The following lab tests are standard for all pregnant women throughout the first, second, and third trimesters. Here’s what you can expect.

Anemia Testing

Anemia is a common blood disorder that occurs frequently during pregnancy. Without enough iron in the body, hemoglobin levels in red blood cells decrease, and oxygen cannot be efficiently transported through the body. Pregnancy increases the risk of becoming anemic, so this prenatal test is a quick and important to identify whether you need to take a daily iron supplement. You will need more iron than usual to support red blood cells as your baby and the placenta grow! Continue reading “Pregnant? You Need These Basic Lab Tests”

Everything You Should Know About Roaches and Allergies

Nobody welcomes cockroaches into their home, but sometimes they sneak in anyway. These pests aren’t just unappealing; they pose major allergy and asthma risks due to their saliva, droppings, and skin shedding.

If you have allergy symptoms but can’t find the source, it’s possible that your home is one of the 63% of U.S. residences that contain cockroach allergens. Make sure you understand how to identify and diagnose your cockroach allergy so you can efficiently eliminate the source of your symptoms.

Why Do Allergies Develop?

There are certain substances in the environment, like ragweed in the fall and pollen in the spring, that can trigger the immune system to act as if it is fighting off a foreign invader. When the immune system jumps to action like that, it creates histamines in the bloodstream that create unpleasant reactions like coughing, nasal congestion, skin rash, wheezing, and ear and sinus infections.

Your Cockroach Allergy

The German cockroach is the most troublesome in homes and is directly associated with causing asthma and allergy symptoms, The American Cockroach, also known as the Palmetto Bug in the south, is just as common and problematic. Since roaches adapt easily to most environments and are attracted to the warmth of buildings and homes at night, it’s possible to suffer from roach allergies all year long.

The following symptoms indicate that you could have a roach infestation causing allergies to roach saliva, waste, and body parts:

  • Sneezing and coughing
  • Runny nose and congestion
  • Itchy, red, and watery eyes
  • Itchy skin or skin rash
  • Asthma conditions like chest tightness and difficulty breathing

Continue reading “Everything You Should Know About Roaches and Allergies”

Testosterone Free vs. Total: What’s the Difference?

Testosterone is widely known for its role as the male sex hormone. It plays many essential roles in the male body, especially sexual health and reproductive development. Testosterone is actually such a crucial hormone that the National Institutes of Health considers it the most necessary hormone in the male body.

Though a man’s testosterone levels peak during puberty and early adulthood, levels fall again with age. When testosterone levels fall too low, important body functions become less efficient, including the functions that control libido, bone mass, muscle mass, red blood cell production, fat distribution, and sperm production.

If you are experiencing symptoms that make you question your vitality and wellness, low testosterone could be to blame. Fortunately, a simple test can help you evaluate your testosterone levels and identify the best ways to boost your testosterone production. Before you undergo your testosterone testing, it’s important to understand the differences between free testosterone and total testosterone in the body.

What Is the Difference Between Free and Total Testosterone?

Not all testosterone functions the same within the body. Free testosterone travels through the blood unattached to any proteins. Only 2% of all testosterone is considered free testosterone. This small portion can move immediately into cells that need more testosterone to maintain proper body functions.

Total testosterone is the sum of the body’s free, bioavailable, and unavailable testosterone. Bioavailable testosterone includes all testosterone loosely bound to albumin and the carrier protein known as sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). About 54% of all testosterone in the body binds to these proteins. Continue reading “Testosterone Free vs. Total: What’s the Difference?”

Hepatitis A, B, and C: What’s the Difference?

Hepatitis is a serious health condition that affects the liver. This STD occurs in three different forms, which can make it confusing to understand. Here’s what you should know about Hepatitis A, B, and C to protect your health and get the treatment you need.

What Is Hepatitis?

In general, hepatitis is defined as inflammation of the liver. Some cases of hepatitis are short lived, but others develop chronically over months or years. Viruses, alcoholism, and certain medications are all linked to the development of hepatitis.

Symptoms and Treatment for Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A is caused by a virus that spreads through the fecal-oral route. Infected people shed a large quantity of the virus in their stool, which makes it all too easy to spread to others through shaking hands, turning door knobs, answering the phone, and touching other common surfaces.

The most common symptoms of Hepatitis A include nausea, poor appetite, abdominal pain, fatigue, and dark urine. A blood test is needed to identify hepatitis A, but no specific treatment exists. Instead, the body needs time to recover from the virus on its own. In most cases, the liver can recover in six months with no lasting damage. Continue reading “Hepatitis A, B, and C: What’s the Difference?”

Why Are Some Women Prone to UTIs?

If you’ve suffered through a urinary tract infection in the past, you know exactly how painful and uncomfortable the condition can become. Women are far more prone to UTIs than men, and some women even more than others. If you count yourself among the millions of women who are plagued by UTIs, the following information will help you seek a solution.

What Are UTIs?

Urinary tract infections occur when bacteria gets trapped in the urinary tract. Since the urinary tract comprises of the kidneys, bladder, ureters, and urethra, there is plenty of space for bacteria to hide. The bladder and the urethra are the most common places for bacteria to live, and this creates infection as the bacteria irritates the body. Continue reading “Why Are Some Women Prone to UTIs?”

Tips for Safeguarding Your Immune System This Winter

As the weather begins to get cooler, it is more important than ever to take measures to support a healthy immune system. These tips will help you take action to protect your wellness.

Water, Water, Water

Your body relies on water to clear out toxins and other “sludge”. This sludge can weigh you down and keep you feeling ill. Water helps white blood cells and other immune system elements reach their destinations to fight bacterial and viral intruders. Many beverages like coffee, tea, and soda actually dehydrate the body. Plain and simple, water is the best. Infuse with fruit if you need a flavor!  Continue reading “Tips for Safeguarding Your Immune System This Winter”

Can STDs Be Treated? Here’s What You Should Know

You never hope to contract an STD, but if you are sexually active, STDs pose a real risk. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 19 million men and women in the United States contract some kind of sexually transmitted disease each year!

STDs cause uncomfortable and dangerous symptoms, but the good news is that most STDs caused by bacteria and can be treated or even cured with antibiotics. Even if an STD is caused by a virus, it can still be controlled with proper medical attention.

Whether you have syphilis, chlamydia, or any STD in between, here’s what you should know about treating your STD. Continue reading “Can STDs Be Treated? Here’s What You Should Know”

Women, Top 4 Signs You Might Have an STD

Symptoms are tricky to interpret. Does your headache mean you’re dehydrated, stressed, or dealing with poor vision? It’s tempting to ignore symptoms and just hope they disappear, but the following five symptoms definitely need your attention since they could signal an STD.

Continual Vaginal Itching

Itches happen from time to time, but it isn’t normal to feel ongoing itching inside your vagina. If your itching becomes incessant and overwhelming, it could indicate a yeast infection… or it could indicate an STD like chlamydia, gonorrhea, herpes, or trichomoniasis. It is even more likely to be an STD if the itching is paired with any of the symptoms below. Continue reading “Women, Top 4 Signs You Might Have an STD”

Everything You Should Know About Prostate Health

Not too many years ago, a prostate cancer diagnosis was nothing short of a death sentence. But today, science continues to advance at lightning speeds to uncover treatments and cures that make survival possible. With the right men’s wellness tests, you can uncover any potential prostate health problems early enough to seek effective and long-lasting treatment.

Why Does the Prostate Matter?

The prostate gland is a walnut-sized gland located in a man’s body below the bladder and in front of the rectum. It is responsible for producing a thick, milky fluid that contributes to the production of semen. Due to the prostate position, it can cause serious problems with urination and sexual function is something goes wrong. Continue reading “Everything You Should Know About Prostate Health”

Gonorrhea 101

Often known as “The Clap,” Gonorrhea is a common sexually transmitted disease (STD) that affects about 78 million people around the world each year. Though this STD can be treated, it is a serious condition that can lead to complications if ignored.

Procrastination only makes matters worse, so it’s essential to test for gonorrhea as soon as you suspect you might have contracted the disease.

What Is Gonorrhea?

Gonorrhea is caused by the bacterium called neisseria gonorrhoeae. It can affect both men and women in the genitals, rectum, and throat as a result of any form of unprotected sexual activity.

Gonorrhea is especially unique because it can be passed from mother to baby during pregnancy. It’s even possible to experience gonorrhea and chlamydia simultaneously. Continue reading “Gonorrhea 101”

A Beginner’s Guide to Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia is a painful condition that impacts million of Americans, but many have no idea that fibromyalgia is responsible for their suffering.

Fibromyalgia is defined as widespread and long-term body pain radiating from the muscles and connective tissues. It is often accompanied by other symptoms like headaches, fatigue, anxiety, and depression.

Though a specific cause has not yet been identified, potential triggers for fibromyalgia include allergies to foods or chemicals, hormonal imbalances, poor digestion, stress, and neurotransmitter deficiency. Continue reading “A Beginner’s Guide to Fibromyalgia”

Could a Mineral Supplement Help Your Symptoms?

There are many painful symptoms that can arise as a result may different conditions. This makes it difficult to determine the underlying cause of your health issues or seek the right treatment. If problems like fatigue, migraines, and irritability continue to plague you, a mineral deficiency could be the root cause.

What Are Minerals

Just like vitamins, minerals play many critical roles in the maintenance of your body’s functions and growth. Minerals are elements in their simplest form, like iron, magnesium, and selenium. All nutrients in the body, including vitamins, amino acids, enzymes, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, and sugars cannot function properly without minerals. A dangerous combination of food processing and soil depletion has left much of today’s food sources lacking the minerals that the human body needs. Continue reading “Could a Mineral Supplement Help Your Symptoms?”

Why Are You Suffering From Daily Fatigue?

How often do you feel fatigued? Millions of Americans cope with chronic fatigue that leaves them feeling so tired that even simple daily tasks feel challenging.

If you can’t remember the last time that you made it through the day feeling energized and revitalized, you could be suffering from a hidden condition like anemia or lyme disease. Since fatigue is a symptom that occurs with such a range of illnesses, only an extensive blood test can identify the root of your problem.  

Signs and Symptoms of Fatigue Continue reading “Why Are You Suffering From Daily Fatigue?”

Do You Have High Blood Pressure?

High blood pressure is known as the “silent killer” for a good reason. It occurs so gradually over time that you may not even realize the impact it’s having on your body. Worse yet, high blood pressure rarely causes obvious symptoms until they are life threatening.

The best way to protect yourself from high blood pressure is to be proactive. Just one simple test is all it takes to determine your blood pressure and start making the changes needed to improve your health.

High Blood Pressure Can Occur at Any Age

You may be surprised to learn that blood pressure threatens adults of all ages, not just older men and women. In fact, one in four men and one in five women in their 30s and 40s have high blood pressure.

Experts are concerned that the increased rate of strokes among young people is directly correlated to high blood pressure that develops as a result of obesity and diabetes. Since checking your blood pressure is just as simple as taking your temperature, it’s very easy to check it regularly and remain alert for any problems. Continue reading “Do You Have High Blood Pressure?”

Signs You Might Have a Thyroid Disorder

Fatigue, chronic pain, and depression aren’t conditions themselves. They are signs that your body is experiencing a larger imbalance that is causing significant symptoms. What is the true, root cause of your ongoing discomfort and misery? You deserve to find out!

More than 25 million Americans suffer from some sort of thyroid disorder, yet only a fraction of them know that the thyroid is to blame for their symptoms. If you are experiencing health difficulties but you’re not sure why, a thyroid test could reveal the truth.

What is the Thyroid and its Disease?

You can find your thyroid at the base of your neck. It’s a small, butterfly-shaped gland that is supposed to make a very important hormone that controls how fast your body burns calories, how fast your heart beats, and more. Continue reading “Signs You Might Have a Thyroid Disorder”

A Quick Introduction to Blood Testing

What do you know about your blood? If you’re like most Americans, the answer is, “not too much”. But your blood holds all of the important information needed to evaluate your health and identify potential risk factors of future disease.

It’s simple to reveal all of this essential information. All you need to do is undergo a blood test.

A Complete Blood Count

Also known as a CBC, a complete blood count test can detect blood diseases and disorders like anemia, cancers of the blood, and immune system disorders. It tests red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, hemoglobin, and more. Red blood cells carry oxygen from your lungs to your body, white blood cells help your immune system fight disease, and platelets help blood clot, so they are all critical elements of the body to evaluate. Continue reading “A Quick Introduction to Blood Testing”